Discussion Week 14

Rochelle M

What rights and responsibilities do you have to protect your privacy on the Internet?

What really is protected in today’s new media generation? Recent news articles have been writing about how even the tightest security settings on sites such as Facebook  can still be seen by those you may not what to see. Recently in the news arose a storys of how Insurance Companies have been looking at peoples Facebook to fight off insurance fraud.

Insurance Companies are checking out photos and things posted to Facebook’s to make sure no insurance fraud is happening. One example is a man’s insurance company was looking at his photos of him drinking a beer sitting on the beach. After viewing this the insurance company dropped him and stopped paying him his disability check for an at work injury.

Another case is a women who is now fighting the insurance company after her sick leave benefits were revoked because of photos that were on her Facebook. The women had taken a leave from work after being diagnosed with “major depression” but was cut off after photos were seen of her private Facebook of her having fun at her own birthday party.

How can we believe that anything is “private” any more. There is so much technology available to everyone these days that any one really, truly has access to EVERYTHING if they want. So I do not know if I can discuss this topic this week because I am unsure of what rights I have to protect my privacy on the Internet anymore…

 

Here is one case reported on ABC 7 Action News – Insurance Companies Look at Social Media Accounts to Fight Fraud

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Week 14 Discussion Question

By: Shelly F.

What rights and responsibilities do you have to protect your privacy on the Internet?

This question has multiple angles because it does not specify the entity seeking my personal information.  My employer would have a fairly open right to almost anything that I do on the internet while the federal government would have to first obtain a warrant to view anything that I haven’t posted in a chat-room.  However, Facebook and other online organizations can pass on any information that I have given to them (personal information, items bought, sites visited, etc.) to other interested parties.

My example is the article “Does Face Facebook know you’re pregnant?” which demonstrates how information is passed for a profit through the “tagging” of certain keywords in posts such as “pregnancy test” or “morning sickness” (Delo, C. (2012). Advertising Age, 83(32), 18-20.). (http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=c07c933e-3fe6-4f55-821b-35a07c0200b1%40sessionmgr13&vid=1&hid=9&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d%23db=a9h&AN=79809620)  I know that in order for companies to reach a specific audience they need the information that tells them who the audience is and the favorite medium of that audience.  However, I do not agree with their method of obtaining that information.  The sad thing is we pretty much give the information away to something that we don’t really think about even if we know it exists.  I wonder who Word Press gives its information to?

Week 13 Concept Definition

Exogenous Vs. Indigenous Media Productions

Exogenous is from the outside while Indigenous is from the inside of any media story.  If a high school student makes a school record and it is reported in the schools paper then that would be indigenous media production.  The lines get a little hard to define at this point because a town radio station could have a story on the same thing and be defined as indigenous or exogenous depending on where the boundaries of the story are drawn.  An exogenous media production of this story would be that of a neighboring city or school district reporting on the kids achievements.

This article from the Leader Telegram gives an account for local sport scores as well as the scores of games from outside the area.  So in this case the story covers both exogenous and indigenous media productions.

Week 13 Discussion

Heath Nicholson

Based on your media log, and the kind of media you use on a regular basis, what are your responsibilities in using media?

The first responsibility that comes to mind in media responsibility is that we can’t believe everything we hear or see. It’s a good practice to remain aware that there are hidden agendas everywhere and much or the information we receive is driven by money – not intrinsically motivated truth-tellers. After thinking about it more, I realized another responsibility I have: not supporting terrible television. For example, I make it a point to keep the channel away from “Teen Mom” and similar programs at all times. Aired television depends on what the audience wants to watch. And for some unimaginable reason people tune into “Teen Mom” consistently, prolonging its existence.

To summarize my responsibilities I would say that I feel we need to remain aware that media is not all fact and that our behavior determines what networks choose to air – so view responsibly.

Week 13 Concept Definition

Heath Nicholson

Exogenous Vs. Indigenous Media Productions

Exogenous vs. Indigenous Media Productions, to me, can be defined respectively as news stories created from an external source vs. news stories created from an internal or “local” source. The reason I highlight “local” is because I think if a news story is internal it can be either something produced within the same city, state, or country, depending on the story. For example, if the story being considered is the Green Bay Packers season, I would consider anything produced within Wisconsin an indigenous media production and anything outside of the Wisconsin an exogenous media production (especially Minnesota).

On the other hand, if I lived in Greece and the issue at hand was the stability of Greece’s Economy I would consider “Greece’s Only Option Is Default”, an article by Daniel Hanson in the Wall Street Journal produced outside of Greece, an exogenous media production while any media production created in Greece would be indigenous. It’s interesting how much the story may differ simply depending on where it is produced.

Greece’s Only Option Is Default: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324352004578133100503267698.html

Week 13 Concept

Exogenous Vs. Indigenous Media Productions

 

Exogenous media are media from outside of a certain place, where as indigenous media are from within that certain place.  These types of media can be separated simply into world news vs. local news.  This article, http://www.cnn.com/2012/11/26/world/cnnheroes-prison-children/index.html?hpt=wo_t5,is a story from outside the U.S.  It is about children growing up inside prison with their parent, because the child does not have any other family members to take care of them.  Although it is an exogenous media, we can easily relate to the feelings the story was supposed to convey.  This article, http://marquee.blogs.cnn.com/2012/11/26/angus-t-jones-of-two-and-a-half-men-my-show-is-filth/?hpt=hp_t3, is about the character Jake from the U.S. television show “Two and a Half Men.”  It is about how Jones, who plays Jake, regards the show as filth and asks viewers to stop watching it.  It is indigenous because it is a show from the United States.

Week 13 Concept

Rochelle M

Exogenous versus indigenous media productions

Something that’s exogenous comes from somewhere else, from outside. For example in our book page 490, it states that “stations transmitting to the regions they hope to influence from the outside those areas”

Indigenous is something that is native or original to a area. For example in out book page 490, it states “operations functioning inside the regions to which they transmit.”

A news example from the New York Times, is about one mans fight against gay marriage. I believe this is a good example of exogenous media productions because it involves a man who himself is outside of the gay community and yet he is trying to place his values on the gay community. He is an outsider to that community yet he is trying to influence from the “outside.”

A news example from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which is a letter to the editor about how not all gay people support same-sex marriage, the article contains his argument on the issue. This i believe is a good example of indigenous media productions because this is some one on the “inside” hoping to translate his messages. He is a Homosexual man who is fighting his case to the public Heterosexual and Homosexual, trying to get out his message that nott all gays support same-sex marriage from the “inside.”